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a conversation with Bill Dimmer

Monday, 16 June 2014 16:23
Share to Twitter Share to Facebook Email Posted by Carmyn Joy Effa

ON FLYING, FALLING ASLEEP, AND FORTY-THREE YEARS WITH THE ESO: 
A CONVERSATION WITH WILLIAM DIMMER 



Merely one year after joining the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra as assistant principal trumpeter, a comical, on-stage mistake caused Bill Dimmer to fear the worst for his musical career.

“I got invited to a Grey Cup party the night before a concert,” he relayed to me over a pumpkin spice latte. “I was being very careful not to over-indulge, but I had stayed up late. The next day, we were playing a piece by Dvorak. A really boring piece that’s about 25 minutes long, and the trumpets only play in about the last 90 seconds.”

And that’s when the unthinkable happened on the Jubilee Auditorium’s warm stage. Dimmer fell asleep. Only to awaken when, in a dreamlike state, he heard a familiar cue.

“I kind of woke up, shook myself, and proudly played my part. What my subconscious didn’t tell me, was that cue happens twice.” Thankfully, conductor Lawrence Leonard met a stammering and profusely apologetic Dimmer at the end of the performance with feigned sternness and subsequent peals of laughter. 43 years later, it’s nearly impossible to calculate the influence this humble, talented, and community-oriented individual has had on the ESO and the city itself since his permanent move to Edmonton in 1971.

From his long-standing role as an instructor in several of the city’s top educational institutions, position as Executive Director of MusiCamrose, conductor for community orchestra Nova Musica, volunteer pilot for Civil Air Search and Rescue Association, and ground school instructor for the Edmonton Flying Club–amongst many other remarkable contributions–there’s no doubt Dimmer has enabled life-changing opportunities for many people.

Dimmer will retire at the end of this season, and recognition and gratitude for his achievements are fully due. I recently sat down with him to learn more about his ESO journey, thoughts on Edmonton’s art scene, and his love for family and flying–an experience that was, all at once, humorous, insightful, and thought-provoking.



One of the initial questions I posed for Dimmer was how he came to play the trumpet. Admittedly, I expected a predictable answer involving trumpet-playing parents or a life-altering concert experience. Rather, Dimmer’s reply took me by surprise, and it’s a story that makes it seem as though fate may have chosen this instrument for him. After initially playing the violin for several years, Dimmer developed a severe allergy to rosin–a plant product used to modify the property of bowstrings–which forced him to seek an alternative. 

“My violin teacher was an interesting fellow. When I couldn’t play violin any more, he said, ‘well, do you know what we really need? We really need French horn players in the youth orchestra.’ So, I took up the French horn."

Dimmer continued to play the French horn into high school, despite the institution’s lackluster music program. The school band contained only two trumpet players–and, when disaster struck–Dimmer was confronted with another opportunity.

“The Kiwanis Music Festival was coming up, and one of the trumpet players had the measles, and the other one was kind of a tough guy, and he had a fight with his girlfriend. She turned around and plowed him in the face with a great big costume jewelry ring. His face was not going to fit any trumpet. 

So, the band teacher came to me and said, ‘you know, Bill, the trumpet and the French horn are a lot alike. And you’re the only other brass player I’ve got that can read music and knows how to play and figure things out. How’d you like to play first trumpet for the Kiwanis Festival?’ And I never switched back. The French horn parts in high school band weren’t very interesting, but the trumpet got to play the tune all the time. And I liked that a lot.”

Even Dimmer’s appointment as a member of the ESO in 1971 comes across as quite serendipitous. He had recently accepted the position of associate director for a musical institution in Edmonton, and the very day he relocated from his hometown of Calgary, the position with the symphony became vacant. Dimmer decided to audition.  

“I thought, ‘well, nothing ventured.’ I had no expectations of getting the job, but I auditioned anyways. And I got the job! So, that worked!”

Despite Dimmer’s humble and casual tone, to assume he merely happened upon these opportunities would completely belie his talent. Hard work, combined with natural aptitude, forged these occasions. And it wasn’t always easy, as Dimmer recalls of his first experiences with the ESO.  

“My first year with the orchestra was very scary, because it really hadn’t been my career track idea. So, it was fairly overwhelming. I was playing catch-up fairly seriously. This was also the year the orchestra went from being a nighttime and weekends community orchestra, to being a daytime, full time professional orchestra. So, it was really quite amazing!”



This shift moved the ESO into exciting new territory. Under the leadership of Pierre Hétu, the ESO’s conductor from 1973-1981, Dimmer recalls how this growth and professionalism flourished further. After growing accustomed to Lawrence Leonard’s leadership style, Hétu brought quite the contrast. I asked Dimmer to share examples of how the ESO had transformed over the years, and he immediately painted a vivid caricature of this conductor for me, and expanded upon the type of response he catalyzed.

“Pierre Hétu was such a change for us, because he was an old-fashioned authoritarian conductor. And you didn’t come to work with your notes not learned. If you screwed up in the first rehearsal–the first read-through–you were in the box. He ruined a few people; he was fairly brutal about it. But, he didn’t ask anything of anyone else that he didn’t ask of himself first. 

It was very rare for him to make a mistake. And when he did–he would stop, he would quietly apologize–and he would stand silent for a minute. You could just hear him going up one side of himself and down the other. Then, he would sort of bow and say to the orchestra, ‘I am sorry.’ 

But, he expected the same from everybody else. 

While that was a whole different challenge in a bunch of ways, it did mean that the orchestra took a huge leap forward. We did quite a lot of recording in those days and got a reputation for being one of the main orchestras in the country. We went from being sort of one of the community orchestras that was okay, to being a real orchestra.” 

The competence and experience that becoming a “real orchestra” brought with it enabled many exciting new opportunities for the ESO, such as the chance to work with world-class musicians and the ability to establish external outreach programs. Both of these developments, in particular the latter, significantly shaped Dimmer’s experience with the ESO, and comprise of his most memorable experiences with the orchestra. 

Well, that, and the Grey Cup weekend, of course.

“One of the things I’ve been very proud to have been associated with the symphony are the kinds of educational outreach programs that they do,” Dimmer shared with me. Upon joining the ESO, educational outreach was not yet a priority for the orchestra, nor did a structure for educational concerts even really exist. Recognizing the importance of implementing these types of learning experiences, Dimmer and his colleague, Dave Hoyt, borrowed ideas and templates from other existing programs, and pioneered an educational outreach plan that was unique to the ESO.

What started out as a casual, small group of students drastically transformed. 

“We went from school concerts with a room full of kids once in a while, to 20,000 kids going to educational concerts. I still meet people who say, ‘you know, I saw you 20 years ago! And I remember that concert.’ And that is, for me, one of the most gratifying things that I can hear.”



Dimmer’s passion for instruction and mentorship extends beyond the walls of schools and concert halls, however, and even transcends the realm of music. After listening to Dimmer talk about becoming a future pilot for an extended period of time, his wife purchased flying lessons for him, and jumpstarted a deeply passionate pursuit. For the past twenty years, Dimmer has been an active member of Edmonton’s aviation community. He teaches ground school at the Edmonton Flying Club, and has been a long-standing pilot and instructor for the Civil Air Search and Rescue Association (CASARA).

For Dimmer, many connections exist between playing music and flying. If you fall asleep while performing either of these activities, however, the implications do become slightly different.  

“Flying an airplane and playing the trumpet are so alike, it’s silly. The only real difference is if you crash and burn in an airplane, it’s a lot more serious. They both require hand-eye motor skills. Flying an airplane and playing a musical instrument are the same in that no one person can do it exactly the same way, in any given circumstance. And you need to practice! Skills go away. Your ability to land smoothly, your ability to make judgments, to see what’s coming up and being able to react to it…” 

As we paid a visit to the Edmonton Flying Club together, one happy face after the other enthusiastically greeted Dimmer. It’s not difficult to see why the trumpet player plans to dedicate more of his time to this community following his retirement. For Dimmer, flying also borders on a spiritual experience, and restores a sense of perspective and tranquility to his life.

“I like flying because–well, and not to be too silly about it–but it’s kind of a religious experience for me. To be able to break gravity and get up, on a day when everything’s sort of chasing around in my head and all of the problems of the world seem overwhelming to me. I get in an airplane, I take off, I get up at 12,000 feet, and I see all these little ants running around. And I see a lot more green, and I see a lot more of the wonderful things about the world. And I just kind of go, ‘Aaah, perspective! Aaah, that’s it!’ It just makes the small things the right size again.”

Dimmer spoke with obvious gratitude regarding his wife’s initial prodding in this direction, and acknowledged, on several occasions, the importance of his family in his everyday life. 

“My wife is the best cook in the whole world, so I like to eat at home. My perfect, totally relaxing Saturday would be to get up at a good hour, go and hang out with some of my flying friends, maybe go blow some holes in the sky. Then, come home and have a really good, strong cup of coffee–because, I love coffee. And, take the family and the dogs and go to the off-leash area in Strathcona. That’s just such a happy place.

Dimmer and I chatted for a while regarding our favourite things about Edmonton, which launched into our final topic of conversation: what sets the ESO and our city apart from other Canadian locations with professional orchestras. Dimmer’s well-articulated answer, in a nutshell, is community–a response that probably doesn’t take many native Edmontonians by surprise.

“Over the years, there’ve been a bunch of people involved who understood that the orchestra was really, truly part of the community. There are a lot of orchestras that go out of their way to deny local players, because they figure if you’re from New York or you’re from London, you must be better. In actual fact, we’ve populated the orchestra with very strong players, from here, who are invested in the community, and invest a lot back into the community. And I think that, after all else is said and done, that’s one of the fundamental reasons that the Edmonton Symphony is less precarious than some orchestras. And I think that Edmonton, in general, has evolved as kind of a community town. Its population is over a million, but it has a lot of small town benefits. I have a real sense of people feeling a sense of community and a sense of ownership. They’re not just here for five years until they get the promotion, and move on to something bigger.”

And this community Dimmer speaks of has certainly been privileged and better off due to his integral involvement. When I asked Dimmer’s colleague of 33 years, Alvin Lowrey, to share some thoughts on their friendship, he replied with a lengthy and beautiful tribute. I’ll leave you with Lowrey’s words to close, as they so accurately encapsulate the talent and graciousness of Dimmer: 

“In an interview, I was once asked, ‘What was one highlight of your career?’ My reply was to acknowledge my long association in the ESO with my colleague and friend, Bill Dimmer. We sat side by side for 33 years which at the time of my retirement was a Canadian record for the longest serving full-time professional orchestral trumpet section. At the end of this season, Bill may establish another Canadian professional trumpet record as he will be retiring with 43 years of continuous service in the same position with the same orchestra.

Bill is respected for his selfless involvement representing his colleagues through the musicians’ union and contractual matters. He is recognised for his involvement in the development of educational concerts for youth and for hosting such concerts as master of ceremonies. He is a fine pedagogue who has trained many successful students. Above all, he is collegial and genial to everyone he meets. With that in mind, I would like to share what he has meant to me personally over the years.

In his quest to ensure the ESO trumpet section sound was of the highest quality, Bill always maintained a positive and collaborative attitude; he never caused anxiety over pitch, rhythm or style. If fact, if I inadvertently played slightly sharp or flat, he would adjust his pitch to match without comment; if I chose to vary the tempo, he would stay with me. Whatever style I chose to play, whether legato or marcato, he would adapt accordingly.

Symphony players perform their best when they know they can count on those beside them for full support and mutual respect. In unison passages that required a longer phrase than either of us could play in one breath, Bill would automatically take his breath at a different time without prior discussion. If he sensed that I was lost in my counting of measures during a long rest, he would discreetly show me the count with his fingers on his lap. Such intuitive support was always highly appreciated.

Bill and I enjoyed an amazing rapport. We played together, joked together, had each other’s back and as a team hopefully produced the best possible product for the ESO. Indeed, performing beside Bill Dimmer for 33 years was a true highlight of my career! 


Story and photographs by Carmyn Joy Effa. 

 

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20 Questions with John McPherson

Tuesday, 06 May 2014 21:25
Share to Twitter Share to Facebook Email Posted by Carmyn Joy Effa



Next up in our series: John McPherson, principal trombone! 

1. When did you start playing the trombone? What got you interested?
 
I started playing the trombone when I was 10 years old. My brother played the trumpet, so I was given the choice to learn either of those two instruments. 

2. What’s your favourite beverage?
Scotch. Specifically, 16 year-old Lagavulin. 

3. Where is your hometown?
Edmonton

4. What’s something you particularly like about Edmonton?
The creative and artistic core that has been formed in isolation.

5. Do you have any pet peeves?
Non-proportional representation in government.

6. If you could have dinner with any three people, who would they be?
Duke Ellington and Frank Zappa would definitely be on that list.  

7. What’s your favourite travel experience?  
Florence. To experience where the rise of the Western Enlightenment happened was pretty amazing. Especially because that movement basically led to my career in classical music.

8. Do you have any secret talents?
I’m a semi-decent badminton player.

9. It’s Sunday morning. What are you having for breakfast?
I might make my almond flour pancakes with veggie sausages.

10. Do you have a role model or someone who’s particularly interested you?  
I think Tommy Banks is one of my main influences, in terms of being a musician. I admire how he carries himself as a professional musician.

11.Name three things–trivial or serious–you can’t live without.
Air, water, and sleep.

12. Do you have any guilty pleasures?
I love playing the piano in my basement. Not in front of anyone else.

13. Is there a musical masterpiece you wish bore your signature?
“Come Sunday,” by Duke Ellington.

14. What’s the first car you drove/owned?
A yellow ’69 Beatle.

15. If you had to choose a different career, what would that be?
I always thought I was going to be a subatomic particle physicist. I’ve always been interested in the macrocosm and the microcosm.

16. Is there something you haven’t experienced, yet, that you’d like to?
I want to go to Fiji. Just like Truman.

17. If you could play on any stage in the world, which would you choose?  
Musikverein in Vienna.

18. What’s an album you never get tired of?
The Beatle’s The White Album.  

19. Describe your perfect day off.
A bike ride in the river valley and dinner at Padmanadi’s.

20. Do you have a favourite book or movie or TV show?
Brazil, directed by Terry Gilliam.

 

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20 Questions with Nora Bumanis

Tuesday, 22 April 2014 17:34
Share to Twitter Share to Facebook Email Posted by Carmyn Joy Effa



1. When did you start playing the harp? What got you interested?  

I started off by playing the piano when I was four. I was doing really well, so my parents asked me when I was ten years old whether or not I’d like to learn another instrument. I said yes, and they took me to the Toronto Symphony for an entire year so I could observe the musicians and pick an instrument that way. Which was a really significant investment for them! 

I was very intrigued with the harp. I think, partly because it was featured often–there were a lot of solo parts. And then, there were times when the harpist would totally leave, while the rest of the orchestra stayed on stage. I kept thinking, “Where is she going?” I think the beauty and the grace of the instrument interested me, obviously, but so did its autonomy.  

True to their word, at the end of the year my parents asked what I wanted to play, to which I responded, “the harp.” They couldn’t afford one, so my dad actually made me my first harp. It didn’t sound like anything much, but it was something that I could practice on. Then, instead of buying the family a cottage, they bought me my first instrument. The rest is kind of history, but I owe it all to them. My mother took an extra job to pay for lessons, even. They put a lot of investment into my musical future, and I couldn’t have done it without them. 


2. What’s your favourite beverage? 
Champagne. 


3. Where is your hometown? 
Toronto. I lived there until I got the job with the ESO, 22 years ago. 

4. What’s something you particularly like about Edmonton? 
I love the river valley. I love the people. I love the soul of the city and how anything is possible here–except for warm weather in February. It’s a great place to create projects. And the whole fact that it’s a festival city means there are so many opportunities for performers. It’s all do-able here. 


5. Do you have any pet peeves? 
People who don’t recognize how lucky they are, rude drivers, and telemarketers. 


6. If you could have dinner with any three people, who would they be? 
I would probably like to have dinner with the ancestors I never got to meet. And then some of the masters of my instrument like Carlos Salzedo–who has sort of revolutionized the harp. I would have liked to have learned about his passion and how he took an instrument that was basically a parlour instrument and placed it front and center of an orchestra. 

7. What’s your favourite travel experience?  
When Chris and I were in Venice, we walked into the Venice Symphony’s concert hall, hoping to just get a tour. While we were there, however, they said, “You’re welcome to come in and listen to the orchestra rehearsal!” We got to sit in one of the upper boxes and hear them play Mahler’s 7th Symphony. Which is just a dream piece. It was like we were in the right place at the right time. We listened to the whole symphony and it was such a treat. Chances are, the concert would’ve been sold out, but we got to listen to the whole thing. 

Carnegie Hall was also right up there as one of my favourite travel experiences. Just being able to participate in making history for the ESO in such a historical building was incredible. 


8. Do you have any secret talents?  
When I was young, I rode motorcycles! 


9. It’s Sunday morning. What are you having for breakfast? 
An omelet or bacon and eggs. 


10. Do you have a role model or someone who’s particularly influenced you? 
My harp teacher, Judy Lolam, who was with the Toronto Symphony. She really was a great role model for me. First of all, she had four kids–one of them with special needs–but she never missed a day of work and never complained. She was the busiest person I knew. Even so, when she taught me, she’d always go over our allotted lesson time. It was never about money for her–it was a true love for the instrument and teaching. 

She taught me integrity in my professional life, and that being a musician is not only being a performer, but also it’s being an ambassador. She taught me not to complain or be afraid of hard work, either. I hope that I teach my students in a similar way. 


11. Name three things–trivial or serious–you can’t live without. 
My dog, coffee, and friends. 


12. Do you have any guilty pleasures? 
I like to research wine. And I always love a piece of dark chocolate. 


13. Is there a musical masterpiece you wish bore your signature? 
I’m happy that the geniuses write and that I just get to play.   


14. What’s the first car you drove/owned? 
It was a little dark green Acadian. I used to have to borrow my father’s station wagon to transport my harp, however.  


15. If you had to choose a different career, what would that be? 
I’d like to be an ambassadress to a pacifist, wine-producing country. 


16. Is there something you haven’t experienced, yet, that you’d like to? 
I’d like to master another language. I’ve also always thought it would be fun to learn another instrument. And then, of course, both Chris and I love to travel–so, explore new countries. 



17. If you could play on any stage in the world, which would you choose? 
I already played in my dream space: Carnegie Hall. Actually, I’ve played most big stages in Canada, but the Winspear is still the best. I’d love to play in some of the big cathedrals in Europe, too! 

18. What’s an album you never get tired of? 
It’s funny, because musicians don’t really listen to much music. If you phoned up any of the ESO musicians on a Saturday night and asked them what they were listening to, they’d say nothing. 


That being said, I really like Joni Mitchell. And there’s this wonderful singer named Madeline Peyroux–she’s a Canadian, French cabaret style singer. I love to listen to her while I’m cooking. I love blues. I love jazz. I also like opera. So, I don’t know if I could pinpoint it to one! It’s kind of whatever matches my mood. Really, I like all genres of music, as long as it’s done well. 


19. Describe your perfect day off. 
I’d sleep in a little bit, and then after breakfast I’d take my dog for a long walk in Millcreek Ravine. I like to cook, so I think I’d experiment with a new recipe. Then, read and play my harp a little. And end it with Chris and a bottle of wine and a movie.  

20. Do you have a favourite book or movie or TV show? 
I’m in a book club, which I love. I really like Canadian authors. I think Canada should be very proud of what it’s producing. But, again, it’s hard for me to pinpoint just one. Usually, my favourite book is whatever I’m reading at the time. 

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20 Questions with Julianne Scott

Tuesday, 29 April 2014 17:10
Share to Twitter Share to Facebook Email Posted by Carmyn Joy Effa



Get to know Julianne Scott, our principal clarinet. 

1. When did you start playing the clarinet? What got you interested?
I started playing the clarinet in fourth grade in my elementary school's band program. I was interested in music, in general, and just sort of happened to pick the clarinet. Actually, I was still deciding between the flute and trumpet and the clarinet, but my mom convinced me that the clarinet was the instrument with the least shrill sounding notes between the three, so that’s how I ended up choosing it. I just loved it throughout the band program.

2. What’s your favourite beverage?
I like London Fogs with vanilla bean. Specifically, from Transcend.  

3. Where is your hometown?
I was born in Calgary, but I grew up in Colorado Springs. I moved to Edmonton when I got the position with the ESO almost five seasons ago.  

4. What’s something you particularly like about Edmonton?
I actually like a lot about Edmonton. I really like the dog parks and I really like some of the local restaurants and shops. They’re not all chains, which is nice.

5. Do you have any pet peeves?
Of course I do. But, maybe none that I’d like to share. J

6. If you could have dinner with any three people, who would they be?
That’s such a hard question! I don’t think I could decide this without a lot of thought… 

7. What’s your favourite travel experience?
Last summer, my sister and I visited family in England. And then we went to Istanbul, which was a very interesting city.  

8. Do you have any secret talents?
No, I don’t.

9. It’s Sunday morning. What are you having for breakfast?
I like to cook English pancakes–which are like a slightly thicker crepe. We put sugar and lemon juice in them and roll them up.

10. Do you have a role model or someone who’s particularly influenced you?
My clarinet teacher in high school. I actually still keep in touch with him.

11. Name three things–trivial or serious–you can’t live without.
Reeds, white wine, and my dog.

12. Do you have any guilty pleasures?
Girly movies paired with bad food.

13. Is there a musical masterpiece you wish bore your signature?
Mozart’s Clarinet Concerto.

14. What’s the first car you drove/owned?
A blue, boxy Mitsubishi clunker.

15. If you had to choose a different career, what would that be?
Something science related. That was my favourite subject.

16. Is there something you haven’t experienced, yet, that you’d like to?  
I would really like to travel to Australia and New Zealand, and lots and lots of other places.

17. If you could play on any stage in the word, which would you choose?
Well, we already got to play Carnegie… So, probably somewhere in Europe, like The Royal Albert Hall in London.

18. What’s an album you never get tired of?
I like Dave Matthew’s Band a lot, and tons of classical albums that I can’t decide between.

19. Describe your perfect day off.
Sleep in, cook, go shopping, go to the dog park, go out for a nice dinner, and go for a movie.

20. Do you have a favourite book or movie or TV show?
The Time Traveler’s Wife is my favourite book.

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20 Questions with Gerald Onciul

Tuesday, 15 April 2014 18:46
Share to Twitter Share to Facebook Email Posted by Carmyn Joy Effa



1. When did you start playing the French horn? What got you interested?
 

My mother had an old tenor horn–a horn used in British brass bands, typically. She played one, so I also picked it up and started playing it in the fourth grade. I played it for about three years, and then I switched to the French horn in grade seven.

2. What’s your favourite beverage?
Tim Horton’s iced cappuccinos.

3. Where is your hometown?
Edmonton. I was born here.

4. What’s something you particularly like about Edmonton?  
The river valley. I grew up playing golf there, in particular. I spent most of my summers down in the river valley playing. That’s what draws me to the city. 

5. Do you have any pet peeves? 
People who don’t shovel their sidewalks in the winter.

6. If you could have dinner with any three people, who would they be?  
Johan Sebastian Bach, Martin Luther, and Elvis Presley.  

7. What’s your favourite travel experience?
I really like the American southwest. My wife and I recently went to the Grand Canyon and some of the national parks in that area. We went to the Petrified Forest and Bryce Canyon, over to Arches National Park in Utah. That was just so unique.  Those rock formations!  

8. Do you have any secret talents?
Golf.

9. It’s Sunday morning. What are you having for breakfast?
I’d make either a Denver omelette or blueberry pancakes.

10. Do you have a role model or someone who’s particularly influenced you?
My first horn teacher, Dr. John Iltis. He was so disciplined.


11. Name three things–trivial or serious–you can’t live without.
Golf, coffee, and gardening.

12. Do you have any guilty pleasures?
Chocolate and Costco ice cream cones.

13. Is there a musical masterpiece you wish bore your signature?
For a horn player, it’d have to be Mahler’s Symphony No. 5.

14. What’s the first car you drove/owned?
A 1966 Beamount.

15. If you had to choose a different career, what would that be?
I think my first choice would have been to be a professional golfer. A lot of the guys I used to play with at Riverside Golf Course turned pro. I was the runner up for club champion in 1980, and the guy that beat me went on to be a pro. That would have appealed to me.

16. Is there something you haven’t experienced, yet, that you’d like to?
  
I would love to climb Mount Robson. Or, for an ultimate backpacking experience, I’d love to climb Mount Kilimanjaro.

17. If you could play on any stage in the world, which would you choose?
Musikverein in Vienna.

18. What’s an album you never get tired of?
Karen Carpenter’s albums. I listen to a lot of her. Her voice is so distinct.

19. Describe your perfect day off.
I get up, I have a bowl of cereal, I grab the newspaper, and I go into the living room and I read. And then I’d go for a walk in the neighbourhood or go for a work out, followed by a steam bath. I’d treat myself a little.

20. Do you have a favourite book or movie or TV show?
I read Lord of the Rings quite a few years ago, and when they made those books into movies, I was blown away. I couldn’t believe they were able to translate those into film.

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